So why is it in Customer Services

Guest User
Why is it that a customer is allowed to speak to you in any rude way they like, but are the first to say how they have a right to this and a right to that?

People are honestly so rude and just don't care the person they're speaking too is a human fucking being.


Guest User
Because, generally, whatever company you're working for, or that your company is working for, wants their money. Comparatively, they don't care much for the welfare of their, often largely fungible, employees.

Though I'm sure it would be different if the big-wigs had to deal with customers themselves.

And of course people don't care. They're safe in their home with a phone - and there's no real penalty for them in being rude. A fair number of people aren't really polite, they just don't want to get into a fight over being impolite. See also, the way they drive (where they're likely to percieve the risk as being similarly low), or people who miss appointments they set, or... well, you could go on for some time. It's the general form of the old anonymity + speech = arsehole.

Though I suppose if we're being fair there are also a fair number of people who are stressed out about whatever, and anger and rudeness are often responses to that - and a fair number of people who manage not to be arseholes even then.


Guest User
[font=Book Antiqua][color=Blue]I worked in such a company. Of course, I will not name them, due to legal reasons. But in any case, I cannot remember any one single call. The entire time I worked there has all blurred into one LONG argument over the telephone. If you were to listen in on my calls, you can CLEARLY tell the point where I stopped caring. Sure, I was getting paid very well, and that job is what bought this computer. But no matter the pay, it was simply not worth shortening my life by several years. And even worse yet, I am not a social person to begin with. Employee shortage or not, they should never have transferred me to Customer Service. After that job, I can see why the Customer Service department had a severe employee shortage. It is not worth the time, or the money.
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Guest User
And I want to get a job like that....

Want is not the correct verb. I have to get a job like that, at least until I get paid enough to set my plan into motion.



Guest User
I can see why my place turns over a huge number of staff, I think I need a new job, been looking for one but there is so little going at the moment on the job market that isn't just a side step.

I have a week off now anyway so that's always good


Guest User
I used to like people until I started working in retail. I'd be pretty happy never seeing another human being again at this point.


Guest User
I also would like to meet new people for the business services.


Guest User
renoldscott;5742118I also would like to meet new people for the business services.


Good for you, son.


Guest User
Ugh, I could do retail again, but only part time. i do my best to be nice to people I interact with, unless there is a blatant discrepancy between paper and their behavior (I'm looking at you, CenturyLink).


Guest User
I guess if you want/have to work in customer service your best bet are small companies. You are more likely to know the owner and the owner usually has a limit as to how much shit he is willing to take. Alternatively look for companies that do business to business transactions, in that case you usually talk to professionals who want a hassle-free long term relationship with their suppliers.


Guest User
[font=Book Antiqua][color=Blue]When I was working at , we were on a strict 3 minute time limit. But some of those calls were very old women who have never even touched a computer, and their grandchild just gave them this fancy new electronic things for reading books in digital form. For them, I would easily spend 2-3 hours on the phone with them, walking them through step by step by step, until they figured it out.

I don't give a damn what my bosses say. [/color]
[/font][font=Book Antiqua][color=Blue][font=Book Antiqua][color=Blue]If that old woman cannot figure out how to download a new book, then the thing is basically a very expensive brick.[/color][/font] If she requires a tedious 3-hour step by step lesson for figuring out how to use their digital books, that is what I am going to do, because that is what it takes to be a customer-focused company. To tell me to do this in 3 minutes is an insult to me, and a giant "F@ck you!" to that old woman. There are times when I was more than an hour late to clock out for lunch, or more than an hour late to clock out at the end of my shift, but I was glad to do it because I know I HELPED someone. If my boss wants me to do that in 3 minutes, he can call the old woman himself, and personally tell her to stop calling. What do you think will happen to his precious company then?
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Guest User
I couldn't agree more. We have a 4 minute call handing target and it's essentially impossible to help people properly in that time. Especially as you say the older people, people with language barriers, learning difficulties, it's not actually that often you get a call from someone who is easy enough to deal with that you can sort something out in 4 minutes.


Guest User
[font=Book Antiqua][color=Blue]I remember getting a call from someone in Russia. Good thing I am a linguist. And of course, I live next to several Ukrainian families. One family's kids come over to borrow movies from me all the time. So I understood this guy quite well.

And another call was from an Army veteran. The book he was calling about was about JFK. Being an Army veteran, he is exactly the type of guy I enjoy talking with. I gladly listened as he told me the story about exactly where he was when he heard the news about JFK's death.

And another call was from an old widow. She adopted her orphan granddaughters, and is raising them by herself. Someone like her, I just have to admire.

The point is, I would never have been able to help any of them if I had not been willing to listen to their stories. It made them feel comfortable with me, and I genuinely had fun on those calls. Plus, they really were a VERY welcome relief to the endless days of arguments.
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Guest User
You could always work for Comcast, they apparently don't have a time limit: https://soundcloud.com/ryan-block-10

I worked retail for a while after college. It wasn't what I had gone to school to do, obviously, so that was a bit depressing but I never really had a bad experience with a customer. Probably because I told them the truth though, told them they didn't need the accessories and scored low on my mystery shopper reports because I didn't up sell them every little thing.

I was told never to lie, but to purposely withhold information if it would help the sale. I wasn't going to do that. But it really wasn't a bad experience and it opened my eyes a bit to people working retail. I've never been rude to them, but now I understand the job.


Guest User
Remember kids: If you want the truth about a person, don't ask them. If you want the truth about a product, don't ask the people selling it.

I'm honestly pretty amazed retail is still around outside of some niches like clothes - you'd think people would go on youtube to find the reviews and then somewhere like Amazon to order the things. And brick and mortar would die fairly quickly.

Though I suppose there are advantages in having someone to complain to in person if something is borked when you get it home.


Guest User
Tell me where I can call you Danny and I'll be sure to make it a pleasant and unforgetable experience.

As far as customer service is concerned, I don't understand why people would be rude just because they can... Now if a company f*cked you over, I could understand that as an extremely dissatisfied customer you want to either blow of some steam or try to get proper trearment even though you (customer) and the employee know somebody higher up the chain is trying to rid you of every penny. Not much you can do if you are the victem err.. customer of a shitty company focussed on short time rather then a durable long term relation with a customer.

Heads of to those who take the time they need for customers who clearly are in need of more then basic assistance. You cannot expect to explain to an elderly person how hightech producte such as computers, tablets and mobile (smart)phones work in a matter of minutes. In real life inside a shop it will take some time, let alone over the phone!

Not telling customers straightforward answers unless they ask the right questions so that you cannot beat around the bush any longer? Pathetic. How do you think those customers will react if later they found out they got talked into options, accessories or products they do not need? Will you ever come to such a company again or suggest them to your friends? I wouldn't.

Anekdote: my dad wanted to buy a laptop all by himself. One shop gave him a silly salespitch to basically sell him a laptop with many more features even though my dad said he isn't exactly an advanced user and basically wants to check his mail, a few websites and store dome photo's and print a few documents. The other shop listened to what my dad's wishes were, dad inquired about some more fancy options and items such as a build in webcam, the guy told him "you don't need that", and sold him one of the most basic models. Result: a satisfied customer and one who comes back whenever he needs to buy other electronics. In the long run might be more profitable to the shops owner too. Unless ofcourse most customers never realize you sold them much more then the customer was looking for.... But could you look at yourself in the mirror? I wouldn't.


Guest User
One thing to keep in mind... People are not usually having a good day when they have to call customer service. I know it doesn't excuse everything, some people are just plain ridiculous, but it does explain at least some level of rudeness. Also keep in mind that you're the face of the company to them. I'm sure they'd love to bite the head off the CEO if they could, but they can't. And company policies are rarely on their side. So again, it doesn't make certain behavior excusable, but it does make it understandable to an extent. I only do internal IT support, but I do get some pretty disgruntled people. I don't take it personally, because it's not personal. Although I do have the advantage of being able to see and directly interact with most of the people I support as well, so that does help. But I have noticed that a lot of people, especially the first time they call me, seem a bit rough, if not outright rude, but it's just that they're frustrated because something isn't working.

Example: The first time I got a call from the call center supervisor, IE the person in charge of the place our money comes from, was after I rebooted a server that I THOUGHT wasn't in use, but was actually the gateway all of their desktop sessions were going through. They all got kicked off, and she was not at all happy. Fortunately they were all up and running again by the time I even managed to apologize. She's now of the people I interact with most frequently, and is very pleasant to work it. And the person who taught me that it's just a matter of circumstance that some seem rude.


Guest User
[font=Book Antiqua][color=Blue]But just as easily, there are people who really should not have the thing in the first place. I got too many calls from people wanting to know why their digital book device cannot download books, and they don't even have internet at home at all, much less WiFi. And then I would get called in to fix someone's printer, and the damn thing is not even plugged in. My most epic moment was when someone called me for why "the computer didn't work." I asked if they use Windows, and their answer was "No. but the cubicle next to me is under a window, and his computer works perfectly fine."

Is there a problem with the software? No. The problem is that you are simply too damn stupid to own the thing! Put in the box, and ship it back to us!




/end grumpy rant
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Guest User
Lindale;5742337[font=Book Antiqua][color=Blue]Is there a problem with the software? No. The problem is that you are simply too damn stupid to own the thing! Put in the box, and ship it back to us![/color][/font]


Uhm. I don't think it's stupid not to know something. Though, it does relate to another point - why they might not know something:

Asking others thing they could perfectly well work out or discover for themselves with relatively little effort - a few hours at most.

It's a strategy that makes sense if all you're interested in is the problem in front of you at that point in time. But if you ask someone a question, you have an answer in the form of a procedure and that's it. Someone handing you a procedure based on underlying knowledge generally doesn't give you that underlying knowledge. Neither does it help you develop the patterns of thought and inquiry that go into generating the procedures. Taken over time it seems to stop people growing, and limits them to applying solutions to immediate problems that they've run across before without the ability to adapt or make that, relatively shallow, knowledge serve new purposes.

Whereas if you find stuff out for yourself, you then have a skill that will give you many answers and deeper knowledge that can be made to serve a far wider range of purposes, (and far sooner than trying to get a person on the end of the phone and have them walk you through it.)

-sigh-

It's a corrosive habit of dependency. It works in the short term, I grant you that readily enough, but I've no interest in enabling it any more than I have in enabling people who want to pursue abusive relationships.

^^;


Guest User
Nemmerle;5742363Uhm. I don't think it's stupid not to know something. Though, it does relate to another point - why they might not know something:

Asking others thing they could perfectly well work out or discover for themselves with relatively little effort - a few hours at most.

It's a strategy that makes sense if all you're interested in is the problem in front of you at that point in time. But if you ask someone a question, you have an answer in the form of a procedure and that's it. Someone handing you a procedure based on underlying knowledge generally doesn't give you that underlying knowledge. Neither does it help you develop the patterns of thought and inquiry that go into generating the procedures. Taken over time it seems to stop people growing, and limits them to applying solutions to immediate problems that they've run across before without the ability to adapt or make that, relatively shallow, knowledge serve new purposes.

Whereas if you find stuff out for yourself, you then have a skill that will give you many answers and deeper knowledge that can be made to serve a far wider range of purposes, (and far sooner than trying to get a person on the end of the phone and have them walk you through it.)

-sigh-

It's a corrosive habit of dependency. It works in the short term, I grant you that readily enough, but I've no interest in enabling it any more than I have in enabling people who want to pursue abusive relationships.

^^;



The problem is when they're PROUD of not knowing that thing and have no inclination to find out. I agree with everything. I just wish people wouldn't pretend to be illiterate most of the time and read the directions. which, on our internal network, for any given system, if they search on the main page, they will find out, how to request it, how to self-provision, procedures to make the app work, etc. No one takes the time to look. Frankly I would, but I manage 30+ systems, and never get to see the front end of any of them, and that's what our support team is for. We know the back end, they know the front. Queue terrible jokes